Shusterman visits students to spread divergent thinking

Author+Neal+Shusterman+reads+a+paragraph+of+his+new+release+%22Challenge+Deep%22+to+describe+his+creative+process+to+students.+Photo+by+Kelly+Monaghan.
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Shusterman visits students to spread divergent thinking

Author Neal Shusterman reads a paragraph of his new release

Author Neal Shusterman reads a paragraph of his new release "Challenge Deep" to describe his creative process to students. Photo by Kelly Monaghan.

Author Neal Shusterman reads a paragraph of his new release "Challenge Deep" to describe his creative process to students. Photo by Kelly Monaghan.

Author Neal Shusterman reads a paragraph of his new release "Challenge Deep" to describe his creative process to students. Photo by Kelly Monaghan.

By Alexandra Dalton
Staff Writer
@alex_dalton04

Broadening the minds of the youth is a difficult task that some authors decide to take on and author Neal Shusterman is one of them.

Author of dystopian science fiction novels such as “Unwind”, “Challenger Deep” and “Telsa’s Attic”, his books feature unique topics that address possible issues in civilizations future.

During first and second period today, Shusterman visited Coppell High School to speak with students in the library taking a creative writing class.

“Something I hear quite often is that parents will come up to me and talk about how they didn’t know their child thought so broadly,” Shusterman said. “Kids show their parents the books and it utterly shocks parents what their kids think about.”

Author Neal Shusterman reads a paragraph of his new release "Challenge Deep" to describe his creative process to students. Photo by Kelly Monaghan.

Author Neal Shusterman reads a paragraph of his new release “Challenge Deep” to describe his creative process to students. Photo by Kelly Monaghan.

Shusterman came across an article that spoke of how adults choosing their political party were most definitive about one thing: abortion. This provided the basis for his most popular novel “Unwind” because in the story children between the age of 13 and 18 can be “unwound” or terminated if found undesirable, but no other abortion choices are available.

“I didn’t write it to make teenagers think a certain way about abortion,” Shusterman said. “I only wanted people to broaden their perspective so they could consider it from a different angle.”

Shusterman will be speaking about his creative process and writings at the Valley Ranch Library tonight at 7 p.m. as well as revealing one story in his collection that is due to preview next December.

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