History teacher attempts to become national elector in next presidential election

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History teacher attempts to become national elector in next presidential election


By Alex Nicoll

Editor-in-Chief

@NicollMac

During second period on March 6, Mr. Caussey researches for a lesson he is preparing for when students return from spring break. Caussey has a passion and love for history and truly enjoys sharing it with his students. Photo by Amanda Hair.

During second period on March 6, Mr. Caussey researches for a lesson he is preparing for when students return from spring break. Caussey has a passion and love for history and truly enjoys sharing it with his students. Photo by Amanda Hair.

When someone is passionate about a topic or idea or activity, they will do whatever it takes to campaign for it, even if it could cause them pain.

Coppell High School AP World History Chris Caussey can attest to this. In May  2010, days after he had his appendix removed, his wife, CHS instructional coach Clara Caussey, drove him to vote in his community’s local election in Flower Mound

“I waited in line for over an hour to vote, went home, picked him up, and let him sit in the car while I waited in line again for him,” Mrs. Caussey said via email. “He was miserable, but determined to do his civic duty.”

This civic duty, coupled with a love of politics and history, has led to Mr. Caussey to be active in the political process, even now trying to become a national elector in the state of Texas for the 2016 election.

Starting in 2002, and with a background of going with his dad to state conventions, Caussey has been involved with multiple campaigns, mostly on Dallas County judgeships.

“I really enjoyed involved with campaigns whether it be with judgeships or grassroots campaigns,” Mr. Caussey said. “The experience is what makes it so fun. Whether it’s calling potential voters or making campaign paraphernalia, holding up signs, talking to people about what this person believes in is so important. Some people in the United States feel so disengaged and their politicians don’t pay any attention to them, that’s why we have less than 50 percent voting in national elections. There is a lot of political apathy.”

For the upcoming presidential election, Mr. Caussey has been in the process of attempting to being elected to the Texas state caucus to become an elector for the state.

Because of his job in education and not wanting to create an atmosphere of bias teaching, Mr Caussey has asked not to include which political party he is running for. However, his love of history and politics trickles down to his classroom.

“I just love history as a whole and him teaching it makes it a lot of fun,” sophomore Christina Davidson said.

The process of becoming an elector is a long and arduous one, with time commitments being the most difficult aspect.

“The time,” Mr. Caussey said. “It takes some dedication. For me the time is a tough component of this whole process.”

But at this point in the process, it has not affected his family much.

“He has been a delegate to the state convention the last two years, but the state convention is in the summer.  That’s easy for both of us.  Most of the rest of it is on Saturday mornings and an occasional late weeknight.  This is his thing, and I support him doing it,” Mrs. Caussey said via email. “Next year, however, we will have a little one at home, and that might change things a bit.  I can’t say what that will look like until it happens though.”

To become an elector in the state of Texas, one must be a registered voter, not hold a federal position in the national government and be registered with the political party of their choice.

During the primary elections, a convention called a precede convention comes right before it. Here candidates apply to the senatorial election. After this, the party interviews the candidate to be up for the state delegation.

At the state delegation, parties elect a chairman and vice chairman and vote on changes to the party’s platforms. Every four years they meet with the senatorial delegates and vote to elect them to the national convention.

In 2010, Mr. Caussey was able to follow candidates to see this process first-hand and learned valuable lessons that will help him in his future endeavours. He was able to see these candidates answer questions and learned what the interviews would be like.

In preparation for his campaign, Mr. Caussey has focused on getting his name out to the public. Establishing a repertoire with city council members, mayors and citizens in Lewisville and Flower Mound are paramount in building his credibility and campaign.

“If you’re just a regular guy, like I am, you’re going to need a little bit of funds and in politics its all about name recognition, so if you’re known in the community that always helps,” Mr. Caussey  said.

If the national convention does not pan out, Mr. Caussey has another plan in place, but is wary of the effect it could have on his family.

“Down the line, locally, I might take the opportunity to run,” Mr. Caussey said. “To me, my family is number one, so I want to see how that affects my family but my wife is great, she supports me in everything I do.”

His dedication to his family does not go unnoticed. Mrs. Causey understands the time it takes and supports him in this endeavour and whatever course of action he pursues.

“I’m proud of him.  He is very passionate about politics, and he takes every opportunity to participate in the political process—from voting in every election, to bigger roles with the county and hopefully the state.  I know that it would be a dream come true for him if he got to be an elector for the state of Texas at a national convention,” Mrs. Caussey said via email.

 

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